<![CDATA[Pioneer Public Television - News]]>Wed, 10 Feb 2016 15:43:06 -0600Weebly<![CDATA[WWI History Exhibit Collaborative and Agrarian Protest to be discussed on Compass Feb 14]]>Sun, 14 Feb 2016 20:24:29 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/wwi-history-exhibit-collaborative-and-agrarian-protest-to-be-discussed-on-compass-feb-14Jennifer Andries of the Lyon County History Museum and Author Michael Lansing are Interviewed
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Michael Lansing, author of Insurgent Democracy is associate professor of history at Augsburg College in Minneapolis. His interview with Les Heen will air on the next installment of Compass on Sunday, April 14 at 12:30 p.m. on Pioneer Public Television.
The next weekly installment Pioneer Public Television’s Compass public affairs program will report on a 10-county historical society collaborative effort to bring a traveling World War I exhibit to the region. Jennifer Andries of the Lyon County History Museum in Marshall is interviewed.  Michael Lansing, author of the new book: Insurgent Democracy: The Nonpartisan League in North American Politics is also interviewed.  Hosted by Pioneer’s General Manager, Les Heen and produced by Laura Kay Prosser, Compass airs on Sunday, February 14, 2016, at 12:30 p.m.

The counties of Big Stone, Swift, Kandiyohi, Chippewa, Yellow Medicine, Lac qui Parle, Renville, Lincoln, Lyon and Redwood have formed the West Central Minnesota Historical Association (WCMHA) for the purpose of cross promotion, advertising and the creation of traveling exhibits. The members of the WCMHA are currently in the research phase in the creation of a collaborative exhibit about WWI that will be shared by the member societies starting in 2017 through 2019.  In a pre-recorded report, Jill Wohnoutka of the Kandiyohi County Historical Society and Nicole Elzenga of the Renville County History Museum share their dreams for what will come of the collaborative effort.  In an in-studio interview with Andries of Lyon County, Heen explores the challenges facing local historical societies in adapting to changing times and demographics.

Author Michael J. Lansing is an Associate Professor of History at Augsburg College in Minneapolis, MN. For the past several years he has been researching and writing a book about the Nonpartisan League (NPL) -- a political and cultural movement that sought to empower citizens and restrain corporate influence in the years leading up to the U.S. involvement in World War I.  Lansing's book documents how North Dakota and western Minnesota farmers mounted one of the most significant challenges to party politics America has ever seen before it was brutally suppressed by business and government interests who manipulated the patriotic climate of WWI to discredit and diffuse the powerful NPL.

For more information on the information presented in this program visit these links:
• https://www.facebook.com/insurgentdemocracy/
• http://www.kandiyohicountyhistory.com/index.html

Viewers with story ideas and issues they would like to see discussed on Compass are encouraged to contact Pioneer Public Television via email at yourtv@pioneer.org or to call the station at 1-800-726-3178.

Last week’s Compass program about Pollinators can be viewed online at www.pioneer.org/compass.
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<![CDATA[Funtime Polka to feature the  Larry Olsen Band and Karl and the Country Dutchmen Saturday February 13, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. on Funtime Polka!]]>Sat, 13 Feb 2016 21:51:27 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/funtime-polka-to-feature-the-larry-olsen-band-and-karl-and-the-country-dutchmensaturday-february-13-2016-at-500-pm-on-funtime-polka
Viewers who tune into Pioneer Public Television's Funtime Polka will be treated to the music of the Larry Olsen Band (based in the Lake Benton, Minn. area)  and Karl and the Country Dutchmen (from the Trempealeau Wisconsin area) on  February 13 at 5:00 p.m.. The 30 minute broadcast will be repeated on Monday, February 15 at 2:00 p.m.and will be available for online viewing at www.pioneer.org/funtime-polka. after February 13. The episodes were recorded over Memorial Day Weekend at the Music Fest at the Larry Olsen farm in Lake Benton in 2014.  
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<![CDATA[Eddie and Martha Adcock and the Ivory Bridge Bluegrass Band to be Featured on Grassland Jam Saturday Feb 13]]>Sat, 13 Feb 2016 15:18:15 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/eddie-and-martha-adcock-and-the-ivory-bridge-bluegrass-band-to-be-featured-on-grassland-jam-saturday-feb-13
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Eddie and Martha Adcock
The dynamic duo of Eddie and Martha Adcock and the Ivory Bridge Bluegrass Band are the featured acts of this Saturday night’s Grassland Jam, the bluegrass and Americana music program on Pioneer Public Television.  The program will air on on Saturday, February 13 at 9:30 p.m.  CST and will be available for online viewing at 10 p.m. that night at www.pioneer.org/season-2.html.  The broadcast will be repeated on Monday, February 15 at noon.  The performances were recorded at the Minnesota Bluegrass and Old Time Music Festival held in Richmond, Minnesota in August, 2015. 

Eddie Adcock was born in 1938 He began his professional musical career as a 5 string banjoist in 1953 and went on to collaborate with many other musicians, including Smokey Graves, Mac Wiseman, Bill Harrell, Buzz Busby and Bill Monroe. He later joined joined The Country Gentlemen. He now performs almost exclusively with his wife Martha and calls Nashville his home.   This performance at the  Minnesota Bluegrass and Old Time Music Festival was a triumphant return to the stage  after a serious car accident that the couple suffered in February of 2015.  The dynamic duo of Eddie and Martha Adcock are known as “the biggest little band in Bluegrass”. Cashbox magazine and Billboard magazine have both named them “one of the Bluegrass circuit's top acts”.

The Ivory Bridge Bluegrass Band features Bill Liners on guitar and vocals, Jim Tordoff on banjo and vocals, John Bodle on mandolin and vocals and Kathe Liners on bass and vocals. Ivory Bridge plays original music with Traditional Bluegrass instrumentation. They are know for their masterful musicianship and soulful vocals.  Kathe Liners writes the songs and the rest of the band makes them into layers of musical delight.  They are based out of Minnetonka, Minnesota.
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<![CDATA[Pioneer TV Seeks Entries for Kids Writers Contest]]>Wed, 10 Feb 2016 14:20:08 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/pioneer-tv-seeks-entries-for-kids-writers-contest
Pioneer Public Television is organizing another PBS Kids Writing Contest to promote the advancement of creativity and literacy skills among youth in the Pioneer Public Television region.

The contest is designed for students from kindergarten through third grade.  Contest rules are available by visiting www.pioneer.org/writerscontest or by calling the station toll free at 1-800-726-3178.   In addition to writing a story, contestants are required to submit at least 5 illustrations to go along with their entry.  Prose, poetry, fact or fiction and invented spellings -- all are accepted in this contest.  

The deadline for submitting contest entries is April 15, 2016.  The winner will be selected by a panel of poets, teachers and writers from the Pioneer Public Television region.  The overall winning entry will have a video of their story posted to Pioneer Public TV’s web site. Ernest Ting of Brookings, South Dakota was the winner of last year’s contest and his story “Journey to the Past” can be viewed online at www.pioneer.org/writerscontest.

This year the prizes for the contest are being underwritten thanks to the support of the Granite Falls Bank of Granite Falls, the State Security Bank of Fergus Falls and the F&M Bank Minnesota of Clarkfield, Olivia and Renville.  There will be three winners chosen for each grade level.  Prizes for winners include materials to help young writers and artists continue to draw, write and read.

About Pioneer Public Television
Established in 1966, Pioneer Public TV is an award-winning, viewer-supported television station dedicated to sharing local stories of the region with the world.  For more information visit:  www.pioneer.org.
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<![CDATA[Forest City Stockade and Installation Artist Dana Sikkila To Be Featured on Postcards February 14]]>Mon, 08 Feb 2016 13:29:07 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/forest-city-stockade-and-installation-artist-dana-sikkila-to-be-featured-on-postcards-february-14Litchfield native Dana Sikkila, Rep. Dean Urdahl and Grove City’s Stacey Neuhaus are interviewed
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Stacey Nehaus of Grove City talks about her love for soap making, 1862 style, in the upcoming Postcards episode airing on Pioneer Public Television Sunday, February 14 at 7:00 p.m. The program will also be available for online viewing after that date at: www.pioneer.org/postcards.
The award winning Postcards team explores the historic Forest City Stockade and delves into the world of Mankato based artist Dana Sikkila, and her famous dog, Murphy, on Sunday, February 14 at 7:00 p.m.  Postcards is the weekly regional art, culture and history program produced by Pioneer Public Television.   This program is the sixth episode of Season 7.  The repeat broadcasts will be on Monday, February 15 at 1:30 p.m. and on Thursday, February 18 at 7:00 p.m. The program will also be available for online viewing after February 14th at www.pioneer.org/postcards.

The Forest City Stockade celebrates the life of homesteaders back in 1862, just before the outbreak of the  U.S. Dakota War. A project of the Meeker County Historical Society, the stockade was reconstructed in 1976 near the original site where it was hastily built for defense purposes during an attack on the settlers of the region in September of 1862.  For the past 30 years, the reconstructed stockade has served as a gathering place for history buffs and regional craftspeople such as flax spinner Julie Hiniker,saddle maker Jerimy Kuhns and soap maker Stacey Neuhaus.

Neuhaus has been making soap at the stockade event since 2009.  In this Postcards episode, she demonstrates how she uses 100% buffalo tallow and lye to make her handcrafted soap.  “People are trying to get back to what's more natural,” Neuhaus said.  “We're growing our own food, we're baking our own bread, we're making our own soap,” she continued. “We're doing what we took for granted and now we're doing it because we want to and we know it's better for us.” 

More than 150 volunteers help the stockade event happen in August each year.  Postcards interviewed key volunteer and construction supervisor, Chuck Fuller, and Robert Hermann, the Chairman of the Forest City Stockade Committee.  Fuller and Herman work to ensure that the exhibits and structures stay true to the 1860’s era.  “I think the lessons of history are important, “ said State Representative Dean Urdahl of Grove City.  "I like to see the young people being able to see what it was like here 153 years ago.  History is alive and we need to remember it and keep the spirit of the past with us today,” he added.

Dana Sikkila is an “installation artist” who loves to transform public spaces with her three dimensional art. She grew up in the Litchfield area but now lives and works in Mankato.  The Postcards team caught up with Sikkila and her dog Murphy in Fergus Falls where she was spending a month in the Hinge Artist Residency program sponsored by Springboard for the Arts.  “The one thing that really draws me to installation art is it has that factor of the viewer being involved in it” Sikkila said.  Her first installation involved an image of her dog Murphy, who she has lived with for 10 years.  Now Murphy has become Sikkila’s trademark.   “I don't know if I would be making installation art if it wasn't for him,” she added.
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Representative Dean Urdahl talks about he importance of knowing local history in the upcoming Postcards episode airing on Pioneer Public Television Sunday, February 14 at 7:00 p.m The program will also be available after that date for online viewing at www.pioneer.org/postcards.
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Installation artist Dana Sikkila shares her love for transfoming public spaces with her sculptural prints in the upcoming Postcards episode airing on Pioneer Public Television Sunday, February 14 at 7:00 p.m. The program will also be available after that date for online viewing at www.pioneer.org/postcards.
About Pioneer Public Television
Established in 1966, Pioneer Public TV is an award-winning, viewer-supported television station dedicated to sharing local stories of the region with the world.  For more information visit:www.pioneer.org.
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<![CDATA[History of Pioneer Public TV Documentary to Air on February 7]]>Sun, 07 Feb 2016 20:10:53 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/history-of-pioneer-public-tv-documentary-to-air-on-february-7Appleton Residents Ralph Schmidt, Judy Pfaff, Jonathon Hegland and Ansel Doll are interviewed
On Sunday, February 7 at 7:00 p.m. a new documentary “Pioneer Public Television -- The First 50 Years” will be broadcast.  The program is airing exactly 50 years to the day when the then named KWCM-TV broadcast its first educational program. Today Pioneer Public TV has grown to become an award winning PBS station with a signal reaching more than 2.5 million people in parts of five states. The program will be repeated on Monday, February 8 at 1:30 p.m. and on Thursday, February 11 at 7:00 p.m. The program will also be available for online viewing after February 7th through the station’s web site:  www.pioneer.org/postcards.

One of KWCM’s founding board members and most dedicated volunteers, Ralph Schmidt, is featured in the documentary talking about the early years of the station.  Dan McGowan tells how his father, Martin McGowan Jr.  (Appleton Press newspaper editor and State Senator), was contacted by Senator Eugene McCarthy in the late 1950s and asked if Appleton wanted a TV station.  The local business community, with the help of surrounding towns, worked for six years to raise the necessary matching funds to bring the station to town.  Judy Pfaff talks about how bake sales were held and Phemie Johnson relates how her family donated the land for the tower site.  School District  2202 donated a one room schoolhouse to be used as an equipment room and at 1:22 p.m. on Monday, February 7, 1966 KWCM went on the air and it has since been broadcasting every day for the past 50 years.

When the first manager and board president William Sandberg left town, Ralph Schmidt was pressed into service on behalf of the TV station in addition to his regular job at the Farmers and Merchants State Bank in Appleton.  Judy Pfaff was hired to assist him but eventually the time commitment and responsibilities became too extensive for Schmidt.  The KWCM Board turned to the new accountant in town, Ansel Doll. “We approached him, and sure enough, he took the job, and it was off to the races,” Schmidt says.

Under Doll’s leadership the station grew exponentially in the early 1980s.  According to one of the early employees Jonathon Hegland, Doll hired local farm boys who had to learn on the job and figure out things as they went.   “I remember the first day he (Jonathon) was here, he asked me what he's supposed to do,” Doll recalls.  "I said You figure it out. So he did; he did a good job. He started our production operation.” 

Doll was able to raise funds to build a new office and pay for a new 1,000 foot tower and local productions began.  Long time collaborator, Roger Boleman of the University of Minnesota, describes the very first live fundraisers that were broadcast from Appleton’s historic Opera House.  Soon the station was rebranded as Pioneer Public Television, local productions began and new towers were constructed in Chandler and Fergus Falls.  But financing it all was always a concern. “The expansion of Pioneer happened quickly,” says Carrie Bowers, whose father, Jim Aasland, was a longtime board member. “It always takes the income to supplement growth and that just wasn't happening as quickly as it could have,“ she added.

After 20 years as General Manager, Doll retired in 2000 and was replaced by Glen Cerny who worked to put the station on sound financial footing and to make the transition to digital broadcasting.  In 2007, western Minnesota native, Les Heen, took over for Cerny and with funding from the State of Minnesota Legacy Amendment, was able to launch the popular arts, history and culture program Postcards. In 2013, Pioneer began to win awards for its local productions for the first time in its history.  “I’ve never seen more talent than we have right now,” says Hegland.

In 2014, Pioneer greatly expanded its viewing area again by securing access to the Dish Network and DirecTV satellite distribution networks in the Twin Cities designated market area (DMA).  The station’s signal is now viewable in an estimated 2.5 million homes stretching from the Missouri River to western Wisconsin and from Detroit Lakes to Sioux Falls.

The challenges now facing Pioneer have to do with the rapidly changing nature of the television industry, the need to stay abreast of the latest technology and to continually recruit young talent to work at the station. 

After several years of identifying needs and planning for a new facility, leaders at Pioneer conducted a feasibility study and interviewed Pioneer supporters to explore their interest in supporting a future capital campaign effort. Shortly after the study was complete, Pioneer members Ron and Diane Fagen stepped forward with a transformational gift which included an offer to provide the land and build Pioneer a state-of-the-art facility to showcase the future of public television for the viewers of the region. 

In December 2015 Pioneer Public Television's Board of Directors made the difficult decision to move the station’s headquarters from Appleton to Granite Falls, Minnesota beginning in 2017.  The new facility will be constructed near the intersection of Hwy 212 and 23 and will greatly expand Pioneer's capacity toserve rural communities in an otherwise urban-focused television media environment.

“The entire region served by Pioneer Public Television is grateful to the people of Appleton for helping to launch and sustain Pioneer for the first 50 years,” said Heen. “We are excited to expand our capacity to share local stories with the world for the next 50 years.”

About Pioneer Public Television
Established in 1966, Pioneer Public TV is an award-winning, viewer-supported television station dedicated to sharing local stories of the region with the world.  For more information visit:  www.pioneer.org.
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<![CDATA[Compass To Discuss Pollinators]]>Sun, 07 Feb 2016 20:10:34 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/compass-to-discuss-pollinatorsAg Commissioner Frederickson, Extension Educator Trott and Carmen Fernholz are interviewed
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Carmen Fernholz of Madison, Minnesota talks about how he uses pollinators to get creative with his cropping systems on Compass, Sunday, February 7th at 12:30 p.m on Pioneer Public Television.
Pioneer Public Television’s Compass, a new weekly discussion of important issues facing the region, will explore the issue of Pollinators -- why they are important and how farmers can be rewarded for providing pollinator habitat.  Pollinators are insects like bees, butterflies, beetles, ants and moths that help assist with the process of fertilization in plants.  Minnesota Department of Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson, Extension Educator Robin Trott and Madison area farmer Carmen Fernholz are featured in the program.  Hosted by Pioneer General Manager Les Heen and produced by Laura Kay Prosser, the program will air on Sunday, February 7, 2016, at 12:30 p.m.

Carmen Fernholz has been farming organically for more than 40 years in the Madison area and he is always looking for ways to improve the revenue generation from his cropping system which includes a rotation of alfalfa as a soil building cash crop.  He learned that there were pollinator habitat incentive programs available through the Conservation Stewardship Program that he was enrolled in through Natural Resource and Conservation Service (NRCS).  Recently Fernholz began planting pollinator strips according to NRCS standards.  He tilled up strips of land and planted a mixture of five native grass seeds and 20 different flowering plants that bloom at differing times of the year to attract the insects.  “Moving toward pollinators has forced me to be more creative in my cropping system,” Fernholz said.  Now he has a new source of revenue for his farm.  “We farmers are coming to understand that it is not only the crop, but the plants we provide for the insects that we need to think about,” he explained.

Minnesota Department of Ag Commissioner Dave Frederickson and University of Minnesota Extension Educator Robin Trott of Douglas County are featured in an in-studio discussion about the topic of pollinators. “Everyone has an ox to gore on this issue,” said Fredrickson as he described the Minnesota State Legislature’s efforts to design and implement policies to address the serious problem of honeybee colony collapse disorder.  Raising backyard honey bee colonies is the “hot new hobby” according to Extension Educator Trott.  She discusses ways to create pollinator friendly landscapes for backyards.

To address the growing need for public education on pollinator issues, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture is organizing a “Pollinators Summit” on Friday, February 12  at the Wellstone Center in St. Paul.  For more information contact Greg Bohrer at 612-334-3388 ext. 111.

For more information on the information presented in this program visit these links:

http://www.mda.state.mn.us/protecting/bmps/pollinators.aspx

http://www.mda.state.mn.us/protecting/bmps/~/media/Files/news/govrelations/pollinators/legrpt-pollinators14.pdf

http://www.mda.state.mn.us/en/protecting/bmps/pollinators/beelegislation.aspx

http://www.beelab.umn.edu/

http://www.extension.umn.edu/source/fall-winter-2014/pollinating-new-ideas/

http://www.xerces.org/

http://www.bwsr.state.mn.us/practices/pollinator/

Viewers with story ideas and issues they would like to see discussed on Compass are encouraged to contact Pioneer Public Television via email at yourtv@pioneer.org or to call the station at 1-800-726-3178.

Last week’s Compass program about the Teacher Shortage can be viewed online at www.pioneer.org/compass.

About Pioneer Public Television
Established in 1966, Pioneer Public TV is an award-winning, viewer-supported television station dedicated to sharing local stories of the region with the world.  For more information visit:  www.pioneer.org.
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<![CDATA[The Jumpsteady Boys and Red Molly to be Featured on Grassland Jam Saturday Feb 6]]>Sat, 06 Feb 2016 21:14:29 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/the-jumpsteady-boys-and-red-molly-to-be-featured-on-grassland-jam-saturday-feb-6
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The Jumpsteady Boys
International roots music scene stars the Jumpsteady Boys and the all-female powerhouse trio Red Molly are the featured acts of this Saturday night’s Grassland Jam, the bluegrass and Americana music program on Pioneer Public Television.  The program will air on on Saturday, February 6 at 9:30 p.m. CST and will be available for online viewing at 10 p.m. that night.  The broadcast will be repeated on Monday, February 8 at noon.  The performances were recorded at the Minnesota Bluegrass and Old Time Music Festival held in Richmond, Minnesota in August, 2015.

​The Jumpsteady Boys were formed in 2011 to represent the American string band tradition at the Australian National Folk Festival. Featuring Bruce Molsky,  Rafe Stefanini,  Mike Compton and Joe Newberry the all star group epitomizes the growing “global folk” music movement.  Whether playing a blistering fiddle tune, singing and a cappella ballad or showcasing an original song, the Jumpsteady Boys are four of the most respected players of traditional music in the international roots scene today.

Americana powerhouse vocal trio Red Molly is known for their gorgeous harmonies, crisp musicianship, infectious songwriting, and warm, engaging stage presence. Laurie MacAllister (bass), Abbie Gardner (Dobro), and Molly Venter (guitar) weave together the threads of American music—from folk roots to bluegrass, from heartbreaking ballads to barn-burning honky tonk—as effortlessly as they blend their caramel voices into their signature soaring, crystalline three-part harmonies.
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<![CDATA[The Barry Boyce Band and Matt Hodek and the Dakota Dutchmen, Saturday February 6, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. on Funtime Polka!]]>Sat, 06 Feb 2016 13:53:51 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/the-barry-boyce-band-and-matt-hodek-and-the-dakota-dutchmen-saturday-february-6-2016-at-500-pm-on-funtime-polka
Viewers of Pioneer Public Television's Funtime Polka will be treated to the music of the Barry Boyce Band out of Omaha, Nebraska and Matt Hodek and the Dakota Dutchmen out of Lankin, North Dakota on Saturday, February 6 at 5:00 p.m. The 30 minute broadcast will be repeated on Monday, February 8 at 2:00 p.m.and will be available for online viewing at www.pioneer.org/funtime-polka. after February 8. The episodes were recorded over Memorial Day Weekend at the Music Fest at the Larry Olsen farm in Lake Benton in 2014.  
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<![CDATA[Sculptors and Art Film to be shown on Postcards, January 31]]>Sun, 31 Jan 2016 20:47:50 GMThttp://www.pioneer.org/news/sculptors-and-art-film-to-be-shown-on-postcards-january-31Fergus Falls’ Naomi Schliesman, Dana Johnson’s film Xenos and
​Sauk Rapids sculptor Sam Spiczka to be Featured
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Artist Naomi Schliesman of Fergus Falls talks about the meaning behind her colorful sculptures and masks the upcoming Postcards episode airing on Pioneer Public Television Sunday, January 31 at 7:00 p.m. The program will also be available for online viewing after that date through the station’s web site: www.pioneer.org/postcards.
On Sunday, January 31 at 7:00 p.m. Pioneer Public Television offers an unusualPostcards episode.  The award winning weekly regional art, culture and history program will feature the 10-minute film Xenos produced by Dana Johnson and recorded over the course of two days in the community of Appleton, Minnesota.  On either side of the film will be feature stories on two sculptors -- Naomi Schliesman of Fergus Falls and Sam Spiczka of Sauk Rapids.  The entire 30-minute episode will be repeated on Monday, February 1 at 1:30 p.m. and on Thursday, January 4 at 7:00 p.m. The program will also be available for online viewing after January 31 through the station’s web site:www.pioneer.org/postcards.

Naomi Schliesman comes from a family of “makers” -- people who were seamstresses, woodworkers, farmers and designers and she continues this tradition as an installation sculpture artist working out of the Fergus Falls area.  The Postcards team interviewed her in the midst of her colorful and abstract sculptures that were part of an exhibition at the Rourke Museum in Moorhead, Minnesota this past summer.  Schliesman also designed the masks that play a starring role in the Xenos film.  For Schleisman, it is all about creating objects of art that people find themselves “wanting to touch and be a part of them, to have that interaction,”  she said. “That is the tension that I'm creating.”

Dana Johnson’s Xenos was recently featured in the Portland Film Festival and was nominated for an Upper Midwest Emmy Award.  The film was funded by a Legacy individual artist grant awarded to Dana Johnson by Southwest Minnesota Arts Council (SMAC).  In the film, which has no spoken words, a group of aliens come to a rural town and are greeted with hostility by some of the local residents. The film provokes important questions about being a newcomer in a small town, protecting a community's identity and traditions, and the masks we wear to conceal our inner identity.  Recently, Pioneer Public TV has been conducting screenings of the film around the region as a way to initiate discussions about the changing nature of small towns as we welcome new immigrants to the area.

In the final segment, award winning sculptor, Sam Spiczka talks about how the landscape of cornfields, rolling hills and the edge of the prairie near Sauk Rapids have influenced him and his work.  Spickza’s sculptures have been exhibited nationally – including at the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, the Rochester Art Center and Franconia Sculpture Park. He describes his work as looking like “physical poetry.”  Spiczka says he is inspired by natural forms and works with fabricated steel.  “For me, steel is not a rigid, difficult material,” Spiczka explained.  “It's entirely malleable. I think of it more like water that it just can be reconfigured and melted and refrozen in whatever shape you can imagine.” ​​
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Dana Johnson’s evocative film Xenos will be shown in the upcoming Postcards episode airing on Pioneer Public Television Sunday, January 31 at 7:00 p.m The film will also be available after that date for online viewing through the station’s web site: www.pioneer.org/postcards.
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Award winning sculptor, Sam Spiczka of Sauk Rapids gives insight to the significance and process behind his work in the upcoming Postcards episode airing on Pioneer Public Television Sunday, January 31 at 7:00 p.m. The program will also be available after that date for online viewing through the station’s web site: www.pioneer.org/postcards.
About Pioneer Public Television
Established in 1966, Pioneer Public TV is an award-winning, viewer-supported television station dedicated to sharing local stories of the region with the world.  For more information visit:www.pioneer.org.
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